Mining

Overview

Snapshot

Employed
270,500
Past Growth
24.5%
Future Growth
8.3%
Weekly Earnings
$2,349
Workforce Share
2.0%
Full-Time Share
95.8%
Female Share
19.8%
Average Age
41

Summary

Mining is a small employing industry. Around 2% of workers have their main job in this industry.

Mining covers the exploration and extraction of minerals, oil and gas. Activities in the Mining industry include:

  • mining preparation work
  • underground or open cut mining
  • dredging
  • quarrying
  • well operations or evaporation pans.

Most jobs are in Western Australia and Queensland. Employment is mainly in regional or remote locations like Pilbara and Gladstone.

A third of mining workers do not have post-school qualifications and around half have a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification. Although some jobs vital to the Mining industry, like Mining Engineer or Geologist, need a university degree.

Most people with their main job in this industry work full-time.

Average earnings are $2,349 per week, higher the all industries average of $1,200.

Employment

Employment in the Mining industry grew over the 20 years to August 2022.

The number of workers:

  • fell by 32,200 (or 10.6%) over the last quarter
  • grew by 700 (or 0.2%) over the last year.

Quarterly employment update, Mining industry

Source: ABS, Labour Force Survey, Detailed, August 2022, seasonally adjusted.


Outlook

Employment in Mining is projected to grow by 15,900 (or 5.9%) over the five years to November 2026.

Employment levels, past and projected, Mining

Source: ABS, Labour Force Survey, Detailed, November 2021, seasonally adjusted and Jobs and Skills Australia, 2021 Employment projections for the five years to 2026.


Sectors

Metal Ore Mining is the largest sector in the Mining industry, employing 42.1% of workers.

Employment by sector, Mining industry

Source: ABS, Labour Force Survey, Detailed, August 2022, seasonally adjusted.


Occupations

Largest employing occupations

Drillers, Miners and Shot Firers is the largest employing occupation in the Mining industry.

The 10 largest employing occupations are shown below. The table shows:

  • the number employed in all industries
  • the number employed in this industry
  • the proportion employed in this industry.

Some occupations are common across a number of industries.

Largest employing occupations, Mining industry

ANZSCO Code Occupation title

Employment
(all industries)

Employment
(this industry)
Proportion employed in this industry
7122 Drillers, Miners and Shot Firers 57,600 50,600 88%
3232 Metal Fitters and Machinists 111,900 26,600 24%
3129 Other Building and Engineering Technicians 34,200 17,000 50%
1335 Production Managers 69,100 10,100 15%
2336 Mining Engineers 14,000 10,000 71%
3411 Electricians 159,100 9,900 6%
7331 Truck Drivers 170,300 9,100 5%
7212 Earthmoving Plant Operators 50,100 7,100 14%
2344 Geologists, Geophysicists and Hydrogeologists 10,000 6,300 63%
3223 Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers 73,100 5,700 8%

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, four quarter average, 2021.

Related occupations

The Mining industry employs workers in a range of occupations.

The table below shows related occupations by ANZSCO Skill Level (Skill Level 1 is the highest skill level). This includes occupations that:

  • contribute a large share of industry employment (account for at least 3% of industry employment)
  • have a large share of workers in this industry (at least 5% of workers in an occupation).

These thresholds were used as a guide only and a number refinements were made to the list of occupations included.

The table shows the total number of people employed in each occupation as well as the number and proportion employed in this industry at the time of the 2016 ABS Census.

  • In most cases, 6-digit ANZSCO occupations are shown. This is the most detailed level of ANZSCO.
  • 4-digit occupations are shown where the ANZSCO classification system only has one valid 6-digit occupation.
  • The 4-digit employment figures will differ from the figures shown in the Largest employment occupations table above because the figures have come from different data sources.

Expand or collapse each Skill Level button to view related occupations.

Occupations related to Mining industry, by skill level

ANZSCO code Occupation title Employment
(all industries)
Employed
(this industry)
Proportion employed in this industry
133513 Production Manager (Mining) 7,071 5,142 73%
234411 Geologist 4,968 3,276 66%
233611 Mining Engineer (excluding Petroleum) 3,851 2,755 72%
251312 Occupational Health and Safety Adviser 15,640 1,523 10%
233512 Mechanical Engineer 13,143 1,499 11%
1323 Human Resource Manager 43,993 1,449 3%
233612 Petroleum Engineer 2,391 1,282 54%
1332 Engineering Manager 14,407 960 7%
2333 Electrical Engineer 13,087 861 7%
223111 Human Resource Adviser 24,183 857 4%
232212 Surveyor 8,363 833 10%
2233 Training and Development Professional 17,799 652 4%
234312 Environmental Consultant 3,474 491 14%
234912 Metallurgist 927 479 52%
233513 Production or Plant Engineer 3,077 431 14%
234412 Geophysicist 1,070 400 37%
233111 Chemical Engineer 2,274 340 15%
233212 Geotechnical Engineer 1,409 281 20%
139912 Environmental Manager 2,137 232 11%
234311 Conservation Officer 4,103 150 4%
232214 Other Spatial Scientist 2,764 144 5%
234313 Environmental Research Scientist 4,103 141 3%
234413 Hydrogeologist 538 86 16%
233112 Materials Engineer 497 71 14%
233915 Environmental Engineer 1,270 60 5%
221211 Company Secretary 783 51 7%
232213 Cartographer 410 31 8%
233914 Engineering Technologist 147 12 8%

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report.

ANZSCO code Occupation title Employment
(all industries)
Employed
(this industry)
Proportion employed in this industry
312913 Mine Deputy 5,807 4,935 85%
312911 Maintenance Planner 6,191 2,586 42%
312912 Metallurgical or Materials Technician 3,368 1,120 33%
511111 Contract Administrator 17,579 898 5%
312999 Building and Engineering Technicians nec 4,128 609 15%
312312 Electrical Engineering Technician 5,929 561 9%
311412 Earth Science Technician 1,532 484 32%
3126 Safety Inspector 3,280 302 9%
231213 Ship's Master 3,299 119 4%
312511 Mechanical Engineering Draftsperson 2,501 110 4%
231212 Ship's Engineer 1,759 93 5%
312512 Mechanical Engineering Technician 974 86 9%
231214 Ship's Officer 567 21 4%

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report.

ANZSCO code Occupation title Employment
(all industries)
Employed
(this industry)
Proportion employed in this industry
323211 Fitter (General) 58,558 16,429 28%
341111 Electrician (General) 106,814 6,804 6%
322311 Metal Fabricator 35,916 3,581 10%
399212 Gas or Petroleum Operator 3,850 1,790 46%
3211 Automotive Electrician 6,611 799 12%
323212 Fitter and Turner 8,642 560 6%
322313 Welder (First Class) 16,192 507 3%
441211 Emergency Service Worker 1,129 339 30%
323299 Metal Fitters and Machinists nec 2,593 122 5%
399213 Power Generation Plant Operator 2,142 115 5%
323214 Metal Machinist (First Class) 2,041 79 4%
323213 Fitter-Welder 803 78 10%
342314 Electronic Instrument Trades Worker (General) 1,388 67 5%
399211 Chemical Plant Operator 1,673 56 3%
341112 Electrician (Special Class) 76 8 11%

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report.

ANZSCO code Occupation title Employment
(all industries)
Employed
(this industry)
Proportion employed in this industry
712212 Miner 31,957 28,711 90%
733111 Truck Driver (General) 129,332 7,410 6%
712211 Driller 6,697 4,582 68%
712999 Stationary Plant Operators nec 4,089 2,452 60%
712213 Shot Firer 1,887 1,490 79%
731311 Train Driver 9,904 1,022 10%
7123 Engineering Production Worker 15,108 829 5%
721216 Loader Operator 4,855 807 17%
591113 Purchasing Officer 13,877 654 5%
721213 Bulldozer Operator 1,437 640 45%
7121 Crane, Hoist or Lift Operator 9,580 628 7%
821712 Scaffolder 7,881 618 8%
591115 Stock Clerk 16,616 611 4%
712912 Bulk Materials Handling Plant Operator 2,446 547 22%
821711 Construction Rigger 6,351 518 8%
721214 Excavator Operator 9,151 461 5%
711516 Rubber Production Machine Operator 1,326 365 28%
899415 Tyre Fitter 6,026 339 6%
721215 Grader Operator 2,087 223 11%
8216 Railway Track Worker 3,936 211 5%
7112 Industrial Spraypainter 4,162 170 4%
839313 Product Tester 1,470 156 11%
591112 Production Clerk 4,235 142 3%
712922 Weighbridge Operator 781 128 16%
712918 Train Controller 1,232 127 10%
711513 Plastics Fabricator or Welder 802 95 12%
711911 Chemical Production Machine Operator 2,172 77 4%
599517 Train Examiner 147 49 33%
712911 Boiler or Engine Operator 575 42 7%
712917 Railway Signal Operator 1,107 40 4%
821911 Crane Chaser 887 29 3%
712913 Cement Production Plant Operator 294 25 9%
711114 Stone Processing Machine Operator 192 18 9%
711913 Sand Blaster 496 18 4%
899414 Radiator Repairer 257 14 5%

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report.

ANZSCO code Occupation title Employment
(all industries)
Employed
(this industry)
Proportion employed in this industry
821912 Driller's Assistant 1,667 1,159 70%
821914 Mining Support Worker 1,269 873 69%
821915 Surveyor's Assistant 1,242 132 11%
899916 Mechanic's Assistant 1,271 66 5%
821913 Lagger 559 55 10%

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report.


Data Downloads

Industry profile data

This file contains data for all 19 industries to make comparing industry data easy. Information available includes:

  • Industry snapshot data
  • Industry employment (20-year time series)
  • Industry employment projections
  • Industry sector employment
  • Top employing occupations by industry
Excel document
Industry Profile Data May 2022

(95 Kb)

Occupations related to each Industry, by Skill Level

This spreadsheet lists occupations that are related to each industry by ANZSCO Skill Level.

Excel document
Related Occupations By Skill Level

(300 Kb)

Occupation (ANZSCO) to industry (ANZSIC) correspondence

This file maps occupations to industries using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) and Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC).

Data are sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2016 Census.

The purposes of the correspondence are to:

  • Identify occupations that contribute a large share of employment to each industry.
  • Identify occupations that have a strong association with each industry, even if they do not contribute a large share of employment to the industry.

Useful links

Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification (ANZSIC) 

The ANZSIC provides a basis for the standardised collection, analysis and dissemination of economic data on an industry basis for Australia and New Zealand. The ANZSIC is a hierarchical industry classification with four levels, namely Divisions (the broadest level), Subdivisions, Groups and Classes (the finest level).

There are 19 Division level industries, most industry data on LMI are displayed at this level. Division level industries provide a broad overall picture of the economy and this level is most suitable for the publication of summary tables in official statistics. 

The Subdivision, Group and Class levels provide increasingly detailed dissections of these categories for the compilation of more specific and detailed statistics. The sector data on LMI is at the Group level. 

For more information on the ANZSIC visit the ABS website


Industry links

INDUSTRY QUICK LINKS
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